Reply to "Seeking suggestions regarding throttle cable improvements."

He's got the right idea, almost. The cable attach point has to securely hold the cable in place (clamped) at the right angle so the cable can follow the arch the carb attach point travels with throttle shaft rotation. That's complicated by the return spring guide and lack of a pivot point at the end of the cable housing. Lucky for us the throttle shaft attach arch is small. It's a function of the distance of the throttle shaft center to the cable attach. The greater that distance the harder it is for the cable to follow. It can also reach a point where it will go over center and act like a ski boot binding. That's bad.

A housed cable like we use will over time find it's happy place so only clamp it where it is necessary. Like people cables can have problems when others try forcing them where they don't want to go. There also has to be enough slack so the cable can move with the engine. Car structure fixed and engine moving.

Last cables under constant tension will stretch at first. Specially stainless steel so you need to keep an eye on them and adjust after a replacement.

Since I'm blabbering think on this. Airplanes go from sitting on the 150 degree Vegas ramp to 80 below zero at 30,000 feet. Airplane is aluminum and the cable is steel with very long runs front to rear. Aluminum's expansion coefficient is about four time that of steel so at 30,000 feet for hours the plane shrinks and it's goodbye cable tension. On a large aircraft you can be talking inches. Nowadays it's all fly by wire so no more cables. But an A10 warthog has a manual reversion system. After your wires have been shot to pieces the pilot can go to manual reversion which is good old cables to the rescue. The old stuff just works.

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