I am using an original york style compressor and I just picked it up from a local shop. They mounted the clutch on it, but it does not turn freely.
I went through the hassle of getting it on the car and then started the engine. It turned then but something is not right. I shut the engine down before I smoked the clutch.
The clutch should turn freely (by hand) right? It only gets engaged when you flip the switch right?
Original Post
quote:
The clutch should turn freely (by hand) right?

No. It is connected to the compressor crankshaft and will have resistance to turning. The pulley should turn freely by hand (with the belt removed) when the clutch is not engaged (energized).

quote:
It only gets engaged when you flip the switch right?

Yes.

Do you have the correct type and quantity of oil in the compressor?

John
quote:
The clutch should turn freely (by hand) right? It only gets engaged when you flip the switch right?

John is correct, but there is some confusion going on in terminology in the initial question.

The initial question seemed to equate the pulley with the clutch. They operate independently unless the switch is flipped.

The clutch acts like...a clutch. It is always connected to the compressor; not always connected to the pulley.

I cannot imagine a shop would mess this procedure up....okay, I CAN imagine that. But they would really have to have their head up their XXX.

Do as John said and remove the belt. The pulley should freely rotate. Not the clutch. Turn on the AC switch - no need to have the engine running. Do make sure the clutch wire is feeding 12 volts. Now pulley is locked to clutch and to the compressor shaft and should not freely turn.

Get back to us on this once you have checked things out.

Larry
I think the shop goofed it up. I could not spin the pulley by hand. I put the compressor in the car and got the belt on. I fired up the car and I could tell right away the pulley/clutch assembly did not like it. I think they put on the wrong clutch assembly. Shame on me for not knowing better before I got it in the car.
quote:
just so I understand the pulley (where the belt lies) should spin freely

Yup, with it sitting on the bench as pictured, the pulley should freely spin.

Unless....a York compressor marches to a different drummer than all the rotary ones I've fooled with?

Larry
The responses you have gotten are correct. The pulley should turn freely when non-powered. What has probably happened is that when the clutch was installed the proper air gap was not set and the clutch is dragging. If I remember correctly the air gap on this style compressor is set with shims behind the pulley.
The York compressor clutch does not use shims to set the air gap. It is set by design. To remove the clutch and pulley assembly, remove the bolt and washer in the center of the clutch hub. Using a 5/8" coarse bolt, screw it into the center of the clutch hub until it bottoms on the compressor crankshaft nose. Continue tightening until the hub is loose. If you don't have the three point spanner to keep the hub from rotating, energize the compressor clutch (with the belt still attached) and tighten the bolt. Or wrap the belt around the pulley and hold with your hand. You can also "bump" the bolt with an impact gun. The nose of the compressor crankshaft is tapered, so you only need to "break" it free.

Another possibility is that the clutch coil (the part that has the wire connection) may not be centered inside of the pulley. You can try loosening the four attaching bolt and see if the pulley becomes free. This usually isn't the problem, but it has happened.

John

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