Gen Light and High Idle

I Need some help...
I have put on about 300 miles this spring and my car has been running great. Last night I went to go for a cruise and I first noticed my Gen light was on. I then noticed that the car would not kick down from high idle (Quickfuel 750 electric choke) and go to low idle. I took the car around the block and it ran rough and still wouldn't idle down and the Gen light stayed on. When I tried to rev the car in neutral to get it to kick down the and then go to an idle the RPMS seemed to actually climb to over 2000RPM. I have a newly rebuilt Pantera Electronics Amp gauge and it was sitting around 0 or just below at idle. Usually it is much higher than this (and dances some)and it didn't respond to revving the car. I turned the car off (it had some run on and didn't want to shut down) and used the power windows and the amp gauge responded. I stuck my trickle charger on the battery and it was reading low. I have not had time yet to do any other trouble shooting. Could this be a bad voltage regulator? Or am I looking for something else? Whatever it is seems to be also affecting my electronic choke.
The battery is brand new and I am hoping the alternator is good. It is a PI 100 amp and has less than 2000 miles on it. After work today I will have a look at the choke wire and voltage regualtor and then start toward the alternator I guess.
Original Post
Ford sends power to the choke from the stator of the alternator. It appears that your alternator is not charging thus choke not opening. Problem could be either voltage regulator or alternator. Does your alternator have an external regulator or is it built in?
Well I changed the voltage regulator and no success with my issues charging or idling. I checked wires and am going to have the alternator bench tested tomorrow. I will be quite disappointed if it is that since it cost enough and has so few miles on it. If not I will continue to track wires since I have came across some really nasty splice jobs from one of the previous owners. On a side note while checking wires I can not find a tach adapter anywhere yet my tach always works fine and is accurate while on the dyno. Any explanation or other advice?
sounds like a bad alternator.
quote:
Originally posted by Otis:
Well I changed the voltage regulator and no success with my issues charging or idling. I checked wires and am going to have the alternator bench tested tomorrow. I will be quite disappointed if it is that since it cost enough and has so few miles on it. If not I will continue to track wires since I have came across some really nasty splice jobs from one of the previous owners. On a side note while checking wires I can not find a tach adapter anywhere yet my tach always works fine and is accurate while on the dyno. Any explanation or other advice?
The alternator has been left at a shop and they are going to open the case and go through everything to see if it can be fixed and or let me know what part has failed. There was an older worker there that was quite knowledgeable and seemed like he was interested in a challenge to go through it and see if he could fix it.
The alternator has been fixed and I also replaced the voltage regulator. The gen light is off and idle down but now any thing over 1500 rpm pegs the Amp gauge. Any advice? When idle at a stop light it's fine a d then as soon as I put a load on it the car it immediately pegs. It has just been rebuilt by Pantera electronics and it was not doing this before
Thanks. I will look into a voltage meter. I have changed the voltage regulator to a different make and put the battery on the charger to make sure it is full and now it looks like most of my troubles have gone. The amp gauge still dances a little but is much better than the other day.
Otis, the needle on a factory amp meter will ALWAYS dance around because the factory wiring routs 100% of the alt output thru the gauge, and starting the engine always uses some battery power.

Many of us install a large gauge 'shunt' across the amp gauge posts to relieve some load from the gauge. The proportion of shunt surface area relative to the gauge innards reduces needle deflection, so use the biggest wire you have available (or a piece of brass shim stock) and double-insulate it with shrink wrap.

Sure- it makes the needle 'inaccurate' but no one can accurately read a flickering needle anyway. The amp gauge is really an idiot light showing 'some' alt charge- or not.

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