Skip to main content

Replies sorted oldest to newest

Should be straight forward, I see Scott includes spacers. You may have to pry the a-arm a little if you have much preload on the shock to get the bolt hole to align.

A lot of folks bolt on their $1500 investment and go, but IMO it does pay to set the car on a set of four corner scales and spend the time to setup ride height and corner weighting. Check wheel alignment (toe) as well.

As Julian says, corner-weighting your sports-GT is very worthwhile to improve handling, and its not just for racers. And watch closely the lower rear shock bushings for collapse with time. Those pieces are the most heavily loaded on the whole car, and it doesn't take much to allow the shock's lower steel bushing ring to sag & touch the steel bolt support brackets. Then you get a mysterious squeek that's very hard to trace.

Soft stock rubber bushings are probably most prone to do this (depending on how you drive) so firmer poly bushings may be less apt to develop squeeks. Check for missing paint, worn chrome or bare metal in that area. Undersized SAE shock bolts in factory metric holes might cut that clearance, too.

I currently race a formula car and handle my suspension set-up. I doubt that one will realize any meaningful handling improvement by cornerweighting a Pantera. Frankly, it is a serious challenge with the driver and 20 gallons of fuel on the same side of the car.

The primary benefit of cornerweighting is braking. To not have the tire on one side lock up independently of the tire on the other when threshold braking in a straight line.

Frankly on a Pantera, I don’t think it worth the effort. Set the ride height and rake from the driver’s side and match the number of threads visible below the spring perches on the passenger side front to rear.

complicating the visual, is many Pantera passenger side fenders are ~ 3/8” higher above the tire verses the driver’s side.

I’ve spent days screwing around with Panteras on scales. IMO, not much to be gained.

Well I got the rears on today. Took a lot longer than expected. Scott included instructions about cutting away the top of the mounting tabs on the A-arms to clear the shock body. This took a lot of time as I didn't want to take too much off so it was a lot of filing and then checking. Turns out you need to remove quite a bit.
Here's how it ended up:
IMG_1056

I'm fighting with the sway bar so I haven't driven the car yet but I'm really surprised how much it lowered the car. I forgot to get a "before" ride height but with these shocks I couldn't get my jack out without putting 2x4's under the tires.

More tomorrow when I do the fronts and hopefully get the rear swaybar back on.

Attachments

Images (1)
  • IMG_1056

Lowering a Pantera much more than removing the DOT headlight height spacers will make bump-steer worse- and it can be in front and/or in back. Front bump is fairly easy to compensate with changes to steering rod heights. Rear bump is definitely not easy to correct. See the POCA article on what Johnny Woods had to go thru to fix it in a Mangusta.

Here's an update which might be helpful for the next guy. For the rears (on my car, YMMV obviously) I put 48mm of space between the bottom of the collar and the beginning of the first thread on the body which got it to a nice height. Slightly lower than stock. 27" from the floor to the top of the wheelwell opening with Radial T/A 255/60-15's.
IMG_1077

For the fronts, I put the same 48mm amount in and it actually raised the ride height about half an inch.

Put in a fresh ball joint while I was in there:
IMG_1078

Attachments

Images (2)
  • IMG_1077
  • IMG_1078
Last edited by jmardy

Thanks for the starting measurements and the overview of some of your pain points( trimming and sway bar). The rears seem a lot shorter than the QA1s I took off the car. I’ve been waiting to install these on the rear for longer than I care to say. Some last parts arriving soon and then I will finally be able to put the rear suspension together.

Fronts and back are the same, only difference is the spring rates ( I took Scott's recommendation and went with 300 front and 450 rear).
For the front, 36mm (again bottom of collar to the first thread) seems to be a good starting point that gave me a similar ride height (25" floor to top of wheelwell - Radial T/A 205/60-15.

Biggest problem with replacement shocks is, NO ONE makes an exact replacement for the nearly 40-yrs-out-of-production Pantera. And the ones that fortuitously DO fit (or can be made to do so), are often designed for front engine cars, not mid-engined like the Pantera.

So the rubber bump-stops on- for instance, gas charged Konis- should be switched front-to-back. The short rubbers should be in front where more travel sifter damping and lighter springs are normally used. And if the shocks you want have different valving front & rear, the stiffer compression valving should be in the rear where 60+% of the weight is..That's opposite to front engine setups.

@bosswrench posted:

Biggest problem with replacement shocks is, NO ONE makes an exact replacement for the nearly 40-yrs-out-of-production Pantera. And the ones that fortuitously DO fit (or can be made to do so), are often designed for front engine cars, not mid-engined like the Pantera.

So the rubber bump-stops on- for instance, gas charged Konis- should be switched front-to-back. The short rubbers should be in front where more travel sifter damping and lighter springs are normally used. And if the shocks you want have different valving front & rear, the stiffer compression valving should be in the rear where 60+% of the weight is..That's opposite to front engine setups.

Why would anyone want to make an exact replacement for a shock designed 50 years ago? There are plenty of manufacturers that make replacement shocks that have the exact same extended length and the  same compressed length. With adjustable dampening and correct spring rates, the ride is FAR SUPPERIOR to any Pantera with stock shocks. I have had customers feedback that the new Ridetech shocks have completely transformed the handling.

jtpantera - can you please elaborate on your statement above:

"complicating the visual, is many Pantera passenger side fenders are ~ 3/8” higher above the tire verses the driver’s side."

My early '72 has this issue - the passenger side ride height - front and back are approx 3/4" higher (measured from ground to body flange). I do not see anything obvious that is causing this based on some initial looks.

Any reason for this (I was going to do a separate post - but saw your response)?

Last edited by Rob Fridenberg

I don't know the reason for the right side of many Panteras to sit higher over the tires when the suspension is balanced side to side.  It has been discussed previously on the  POCA Forum and there is only conjecture of poor alignment of the body panels during assembly in the jigs.

Frankly, it is not something most people notice unless they have performed suspension set-up.

FWIW, I heard there were THREE different assembly jigs, all of which were repaired during production. One also sees the effect of rt side anomaly when attempting to weight-balance the 4 corners, since it takes a bit more shock height adjustment on one corner than the other to get good balance. This is on '72 s/n 4366. I thought it might be unnoticed chassis damage by a P.O. Good to have another possibility- thanks, JT!

@hightech posted:

Zr1Pantera

You mentioned extended shock length of 15.2” and 4.1” stroke. Are these the 4.1” stroke shocks with the 1” extended eyelet mounts (15.230” extended length) ? Do you recommend these shocks for both front and rear applications ?

Yes, you are correct. These are perfect for front or back with the correct spring rate and dampening setting.

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×