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All,

While chasing a linkage problem, which embarrassingly turned out to be a not so tight turnbuckle jam nut (word to the wise, there) I finally fabricated something that has been on my mind for years.
Following the technical manual linkage adjustment directions, I located the shift arm as instructed and then took measurements.
This is what I came up with:
1D4910C6-E40E-4202-B0D7-9BD9C63FFF82
5BE3A6AF-5574-40DE-BC89-59EE3E8CE16E
Larry
Sent from me using a magic, handheld electronic gizmo.

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Worked great, which is why I have shared it.  

For me the hardest part of adjusting the linkage is the precision required when the turnbuckle jam nuts are tightened. Just a fraction of a degree of unintended rotation of the shift rod can be enough to create shifting difficulties.

My brackets prevent that unintended rotation, while also centering the shift arm front to rear and left to right

Larry

Larry - looks like the business.

I have previously messed around with wooden wedges with only middling success. I will make up a centering rig like this one .

I am about to pull out the dash and center console ( yet again ....) and am going to get rid of a badly notched gear shift lever with a new one from one from Mike M. A very nice replacement item I must say.

I have never been very happy with the final position of reverse selection which always winds up only 2/3rds up the gate, and reverse always seems to be difficult to select. I don't know if this is common.  All the other selection positions are good OK. I will  recheck the ZF selector box bolt clearances and penetrations as per suggestions from other posts , and I have already checked the reverse light switch penetration which seems OK .

Any other suggestions welcome!

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