The Pantera I purchased #5972, included a GTS mini Air Dam 'Not Installed'.
This air dam is a simple flat dam with a very
small lip on one side.
What's the best attachment method?
Thanks for your suggestions ...
Original Post
You have the Pantera Performance Center, Dennis Quella, "no-holes GTS spoiler".

It is offered in ABS plastic and fiberglass.

I run the ABS version on 2511. I have found it will last about 4-6 years before finally suffering from all the little driveway drags and abuse it suffers.

Dennis includes about 20 small 8/32 screws, nuts and washers.

I've never used them.

I use sheet metal screws. I like to spread out the contact patch by cutting 2" lengths of a 1/4" hard plastic tube, drilling them in the center (like a Propeller) and running the screws through the drilled hole.

His installation instructions admit there may be (and I find there always is) some gap between the body and the spoiler. He suggests filling with black silicone. Once you have to remove-scrape-pick the old silicone off when installing a replacement spoiler, you will likely omit the silicone in favor of a gap that is so low and so hidden (as long as your lower valance is still painted satin black) that no one will ever notice it.

I find there is usually about a 3/8" gap (widest) in the center 20" or so. I use some black plastic spacers to fill the gap as needed.

Make sure you do not install it too close to the ground. I like about 3 1/2" clearance at the front of the spoiler. Closer and the driveways just eat it up quicker.

Try taping it in place until you find a position that looks right.

Larry

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Larry, Thanks for the info and pics.

You said -
quote:
I use sheet metal screws. I like to spread out the contact patch by cutting 2" lengths of a 1/4" hard plastic tube, drilling them in the center (like a Propeller) and running the screws through the drilled hole.


Just to make sure I understand, you install these 2" plastic tube 'propellers' between the air dam and the car body everywhere you have a sheet metal screw?
No.

The head of the sheet metal screw rests directly on the tubing, which spreads the load placed on the spoiler.

I found the normal stresses seen by the spoiler tended to eventually lead to structural failure of the spoiler at the screws.

Due to the contour of the spoiler near the body, you cannot use a conventional flat, round steel washer. While one could be used, it would not sit smoothly on the curved spoiler area, and would just create new stress locations. The tubing will fit solidly against the curved portion of the spoiler where it meets the body, and serves as a washer.

Larry

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