...I use a 'Break-Away' Torque Wrench and put them at 50 Ft/Lbs, No More No Less. At 50, the Nuts get pretty Tight!

If one was to go to 80 Ft/Lbs....(I Don't Know where That came from?) The Lug Nut would strip Before You got to 65! IMO. On a Aluminum Wheel with a Tapered Seat...You would more than Likely, Crack the Rim. "Listen to Me NOW! Or Believe Me LATER!" MJ

marlinjack posted:

..If one was to go to 80 Ft/Lbs....(I Don't Know where That came from?) The Lug Nut would strip Before You got to 65! IMO. On a Aluminum Wheel with a Tapered Seat...You would more than Likely, Crack the Rim. "Listen to Me NOW! Or Believe Me LATER!" MJ

from a Tire Shop!  (a reason to watch them)

marlinjack posted:

...I use a 'Break-Away' Torque Wrench and put them at 50 Ft/Lbs, No More No Less. At 50, the Nuts get pretty Tight!

If one was to go to 80 Ft/Lbs....(I Don't Know where That came from?) The Lug Nut would strip Before You got to 65! IMO. On a Aluminum Wheel with a Tapered Seat...You would more than Likely, Crack the Rim. "Listen to Me NOW! Or Believe Me LATER!" MJ

I will " Listen to You NOW" 50 Ft/Lbs

Rambling thoughts (probably even incoherent)

I was supposed to have been an Engineer in my previous Life.

I observed that bolting recommendations were dictated by the design of the stud, the contacting elements and their reuse life.   That is every “X” stud was tightening the same no matter in where it is used.

Notice “normal” torque tables only have the bolt grade and size to chose either a dry or lube torque value.  

In this case of a 12mm stud that is going to be used a few times in its life should be torque to a max of 80 ft-lbs.  In the case of a Campy wheel, the torque should be reduced to 50 ft-lbs as not to damage the wheel.

If the design of the car and wheel requires more holding force, then the size or the number of studs is increased

If the wheel can withstand increase holding force (without shorten its reuse life) increase from 50 to 80 would be ok.  If the wheel can withstand, one can increase the torque farther, but that then reduces the number of times the stud can be reused.   The maximum holding force is achieved when the bolt is torque to the point it begins to give, then it is used only once

 In the case I am wrong or disagree, that’s fine, just my thoughts this morning (I miss previous life)

I've been using 65 ft-lbs for my Volvo's with aluminium wheels all my life. Running 15" to 18" wheels, same torque.

They have the same 12 x 1.5 mm thread. Never broken a stud and never had a nut loose. (Maybe Volvo has better quality studs?)

Oh, and we have winter wheels here, so the wheels get changed twice a year.

jfb05177 posted:

Rambling thoughts (probably even incoherent)

I was supposed to have been an Engineer in my previous Life.

I observed that bolting recommendations were dictated by the design of the stud, the contacting elements and their reuse life.   That is every “X” stud was tightening the same no matter in where it is used.

Notice “normal” torque tables only have the bolt grade and size to chose either a dry or lube torque value.  

In this case of a 12mm stud that is going to be used a few times in its life should be torque to a max of 80 ft-lbs.  In the case of a Campy wheel, the torque should be reduced to 50 ft-lbs as not to damage the wheel.

If the design of the car and wheel requires more holding force, then the size or the number of studs is increased

If the wheel can withstand increase holding force (without shorten its reuse life) increase from 50 to 80 would be ok.  If the wheel can withstand, one can increase the torque farther, but that then reduces the number of times the stud can be reused.   The maximum holding force is achieved when the bolt is torque to the point it begins to give, then it is used only once

 In the case I am wrong or disagree, that’s fine, just my thoughts this morning (I miss previous life)

i was me too supposed to have been an engineer in a previous life and I totally agree with what you wrote.

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