quote:
Excellent point. My aftermarket rims don't have that extra lip. So instead of an extra 1/2 on each side like the drawing, mine have approximately 1/4 extra on each side. So my 9 inch rims measure 9.5 inches from the outside to the outside portion of the rim. They measure 9 inches where the tire seats.

My rear 12 inch rims measure 12.5 from the outside lip to the outside lip.


This is exactly why most high-end wheel manufacturers nearly always refer to offset as opposed to backspacing. With offset, the thickness of the outer "lip" doesn't effect the measurement. You would typically only have a half-inch thick outer lip with a cast alloy wheel.
My front rims are centre offset.
I take the measurements from the important part of the rim, the bead area.
What is outside of the bead face is of no consequence & varies greatly between pressed steel, cast alloy or spun rims.

Kirk, I’m in Perth Western Australia.
Yes it would be great to catch up.

Regards,
Tony.
To David's point, if we don't use a consistent way to measure the offset or backspace, the data is useless or misleading. Offset may be a better number since the lip type doesn't matter...

Thanks for all the info, I wasn't sure how to measure rim width and offset/backspace until this topic came up.
Larry.
So that extra plate that can be seen in my original arm is not "original" & possibly modified?
With my huge 345/35-19 tyres I needed to lower the car alot to get the stance right.
So I made my new top arms a little longer to dial out some of the excessive negative camber & included the adjustment for fine tuning.
regards,
Tony.
Tony, most Panteras' upper rear subframes tend to spread and distort over time, developing excess negative camber. Huge, sticky rear tires tend to make this situation worse, even cracking paint on the rear fenders. The stock bay brace is almost useless in preventing all this since, along with the upper front ball joint mounts, one simply cannot tighten the bolts tight enough to prevent bumps from making the bolts move.

With a good aftermarket (or home-made) adjustable upper bay brace, the rear chassis can be preloaded enough, slowly over time, to tease the rear subframes back into stock alignment. This makes longer upper rear a-arms redundent, although most I've seen appear stronger than stock. And at least they're better than some early efforts to 'correct' excess rear camber by lathe-cutting the lower a-arm clevis-ends so the lower a-arms were pulled inward more.... while weakening the attach points to the frame.
Good points Bosswrench.
I love hearing the history of Pantera issues, cures & modifications.
My negative camber issue is the top arm going past horizontal.
This is due to lowering the car so much due to the large wheel diameter.
As the car lowers the top arm arcs inward & progressively throws the rear into negative camber.
Here is a picture of my engine bay brace.
The rear attachments connect to the old bumper mounts.
Although I’m going to have to gut out the engine bay for the new engine, which gives me the opportunity to reinforce these areas & add bar work as required.
Regards,
Tony.

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More slow progress.
Front hood being made.
A curved piece of 20x20 RHS has been tack welded across the Hood to help keep its shape whilst the rolled edge for the radiator ducting is being formed.
The front edge of the ducting has yet to be formed.
The hood has been made from scratch with internal pressed bracing that mimics the original Detomaso factory part.
Side rockers have also been cut off ready for rolling new items.
Regards,
Tony.

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Photos (1)
The new hood has been receiving more attention.
The internal panels that form the radiator duct are being formed.
Here they can be seen tack welded in place.
A jig needs to be made to make sure right & left sides of the duct are welded in symmetrical.
Panels have to be removed, trimmed to size, slightly re-shaped before being finally welded in place.
Regards,
Tony.

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Photos (1)
Kjeld.
The distance is around 350mm.
But it is to be ducted as well with a shroud that fits with a rubber seal against the back face of the radiator.
And the hood opening will seal against the top edge of this shroud.
The shroud will contain two fans.
So the shroud becomes an adaptor between the radiator & hood.
It is designed so the radiator seals with rubber against the front of the bodywork.
So all the air that enters the grill must go through the radiator, then through the shroud & up out of the hood.
The air flow through all of these parts flows very clean with no obstructions.
regards,
Tony.
Kjeld.
I have not made the shroud yet.
Once the hood is finished then I joint the radiator to the hood with the shroud.
It will be a bolt in Aluminium item.
But I will post the results once it's made.
As you can see with what I'm doing the whole system is designed for better cooling.
regards,
Tony
Kjeld.
I sent you the laser cutting file for the weld on Pantera nose didn't I ?
Yes, both the bib spoiler & the shroud/hood will produce down-force.
I also plan to install little wing shaped aluminium louvers where the shroud joins the hood.
This will act as a grill & block out vision of the fans & radiator so our law enforcement idiots cannot see the radiator.
(some stupid law they have regarding fluid getting on your windscreen from rear facing holes in the hood).
regards,
Tony.
Loven it Tony. Looks fantastic. I feel like I just keep saying the same things in your posts... "stunning work". Thumbs Up!

Will you use lexan light covers then..?

I truly love your style. I like all aspects of your designs/executions. I wish I had the balls to do such modifications...I'm always afraid to depart from original form. Confused
Thanks Rob.
I like the look of the lights without the covers.
That dark eyed hooded recessed look, a little like the mustang.
The headlight bucket has a vent to prevent air pressure build up which will likely be vented to the brakes.
The idea of the car has always been performance & function first, & if we can give it a tough elegant stance at the same time then that's a bonus.
regards,
Tony.

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