Noticed my pedal was drifting ever so slowly to the floor, and thought 'uh oh'. Time to consider my next project, like now. Appears to be the original booster and master.

So at minimum, a master cylinder is in my future, then the "while you're in there bug" bit me.

A daunting number of choices out there, and follwing a good bit of 'thread search', wanted to pose this to the experts:

1) I don't track the car at all.
2) Running stock 15s, but with 8 and 10 wide wheels.
3) Prefer 'stock' apperance in the trunk compartment, though a minor deviation not bothersome.
4) As all of us, would prefer to spend $0, but can stomach up to $2grand done, so likely not able to get the 'big buck brake kit'.

Noticed sponsors offer bigger bore master cylinders, with what is claimed as 'superior flow' and 'better feel'.

All advice gladly accepted. Will stop driving the car til this is resolved.

Original Post

Once the proportioning valve (which is installed in the front circuit) is removed from the car the Pantera braked very well for the early 1970s era ... but it didn't brake very well after repeated stops because the disks were not ventillated ... the brakes would fade due to heat. There really isn't anything wrong with the performance of the brake system hydraulically outside of the proportioning valve being installed in the front circuit. The front brakes are decent assemblies with 4 piston calipers. The rear brake assemblies however are very undersized.

Is an oem style master available from Steve Wilkinson? If so, my advice would be to buy one, disassemble it before you install it in your car, clean it thoroughly, inspect the bores, lube the parts properly & re-assemble it, fill the master with fresh brake fluid and bench bleed it before you install it in your Pantera.

_______________________________________________
Minimum brake upgrade:

  • remove the proportioning valve from the hydraulic brake system entirely
  • replace the master cylinder with an oem style master cylinder
  • rebuild the front calipers
  • replace the front disks with ventillated disks
    (modified '65 - '67 Mustang disks)
  • front brake pads are available from EBC, Raybestos, JFZ, or Porterfield
    (I recommend ceramic pads for street cars)


amendment to list based on discussion in this thread:

  • replace the rear brake assemblies with the rear brake kit from SACC Restorations (the kit employs Wilwood 4 piston calipers).
  • retain the oem rear brake assemblies to use as parking brakes only. Parking brake options also include assemblies manufactured by IPSCO or Wilwood. SACC has a Pantera specific parking brake composed of Wilwood components.


_______________________________________________

The money you spend on this brake restoration & upgrade is guaranteed to be money well spent. You'll agree the first time you stop hard. The brakes shall feel "racier" and safer too. You'll enjoy the brakes the Pantera should have been equipped with in the first place. Its an invisble upgrade that won't detract from the original looks of your Pantera

Rock and Roll

-G

Hi Adams,

We can design a kit to upgrade as much or as little of the system as you wish (or your budget allows).

I completely agree with George that there is nothing wrong with the original hydraulics on the car after removing the stock proportioning valve.

We offer a complete brake upgrade for 15 inch wheels that includes 12.19 inch rotors. Drill, Slotted and Vented with a great looking black e-coating that gets removed immediately upon brake in. This gives a great contrast while providing rust protection on the non-contact areas of the rotors. That kit can be viewed at: http://pantera.saccrestorations.net/sak2001.html

Another option is simply upgrading just the rears. My recommendation is to go with the kit that provides a balanced system designed to work with the stock Pantera Master Cylinder. Our kits are all computer designed and track tested.

Take care, Scott
What are you looking to upgrade? Just Calipers? Would you like to upgrade just the rears? We can provide a kit designed for your needs.

I am not clear on what you are looking to accomplish? Are you only looking for a hydraulics upgrade?

The lowest cost and biggest bang for the buck, for a brake upgrade, is to remove the proportioning valve and then upgrade the rears to a 4 piston setup. Those 2 items alone will provide an unbelievable upgrade over stock!
I agree. Take the proportioning valve out. Why the factory felt they needed it is beyond me.
It is one strange Alien device.
I almost can see Dan Akroid with his Conehead makeup on saying that he was French being the engineer in charge, in between consuming mass quantities of beer that is?
Hum. A second thought was maybe it was Alejandro? He said he was from Argentina, but can he prove that? LOL.
quote:
Originally posted by Cowboy from Hell:
Picture 2. This proportioning valve (yellow arrow) is a little different configuration. But its in the same general place in the trunk.


I guess no one noticed the maxed out (1-1/2") pedal plate spacer on the foot box on this car did they? I did. I can't stand it when someone takes my advice?

Look closely. You will see the joint in the truck lining material and how close it is to the edge of the battery box cover. Big Grin
You can modify the proportioning valve to be nothing more then a pass through device so you don't have to worry about fittings etc...

You remove the valve, open it up and remove the part that regulates the pressure. It then becomes a non-functioning proportioning valve and you reinstall it and you're done...
quote:
Originally posted by Z06 Pantera:
You can modify the proportioning valve to be nothing more then a pass through device so you don't have to worry about fittings etc...

You remove the valve, open it up and remove the part that regulates the pressure. It then becomes a non-functioning proportioning valve and you reinstall it and you're done...


Simple solution. Still looks stock. Like I'm making money over here... to save up for some REAL BRAKES!

Thanks Scott, very much.
I used a parts-store Amercian-thread T-fitting and put on matching fittings w/ a double-flaring tool from the same store (cheapo import junk, not the $70 quality one) - it all works fine and you will only be spending about $25 total for tool, fittings, and T.
I'm going to redo my brakes also, but not sure removing the proportioning valve entirely is such good idea. Possibly replace it with a new adjustable one?

Usually the proportioning valve is put in to stop the rear tires from locking up before the fronts lock. Imagine you're hauling buns in a sweeping corner at 60 mph or higher, you hit the brakes hard, if the rear circuit gets too much pressure because you removed the proportioning valve the system lockups up the rear tires before the fronts, losing traction, sending the car into a spin. At least that's what the proportioning valve was supposed to do I thought. I had one of the McLaren Can Am cars and remember spending a lot of effort making sure the front and rear brake bias locked the fronts first, leaving the rears still turning.

Maybe if you are running 335's in the rear and 225's in front you have so much rubber on the ground in the rear that the brakes won't lock the rears before the fronts...but normally that what most manufactures do. I had a Fiat Spider in college that had a variable proportioning valve that was actuated by lift in the rear of the car...as you hit the brakes and the front of the car would squat(planting the front tires giving more traction) and the rear would start to rise(giving less traction), the proportioning valve would gradually lessen the rear pressure to stop the locking of the rear tires.

I have heard from Steve Wilkinson that he sells a 1" master that gives the brake system a much better feel with stock calipers.
Tom,

The stock proportioning valve in the Pantera reduced the line pressure to the front calipers, not to the rears.

quote:
I have heard from Steve Wilkinson that he sells a 1" master that gives the brake system a much better feel with stock calipers.

An increase in master cylinder bore will result in less pedal travel ("better feel"), and an increase in pedal effort (as in push harder).

John

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