FOAM air cleaners are dangerous on Webers regardless of tune, but paper ones are fine. K & Ns are maybe OK. What happens in IR intake manifolds is, very strong air pulses go back and forth from carb tip to intake valve, and carburetors are dumb devices: they will meter gas in either direction. So at resonant rpms, you get a small cloud of gas hanging above the carb ram tubes (sometimes called 'reversion'). The cloud soaks foam air cleaners; now all you need is a small backfire on starting and the whole thing bursts into flame. ALWAYS carry a fire extinguisher when running Webers! I've had 2 Weber-fires and my a... was saved the first time by a passing trucker with an extinguisher; the second time I had my own... The nice foam cleaners wound up in a ditch.
Next thing that happens if you don't get the fire out pronto is, the 8 small aux venturis that are in the middle of each carb throat are made of pot-metal, which melts at low temp in the fire and runs down the short intakes to the cylinder. If an intake valve happens to be open, molten metal runs into that cylinder and hardens on the piston. Guess what happens when you try to restart the motor? Time for a couple of new pistons!
FWIW, EFI does not meter fuel in reverse so this doesn't happen; just another little-known advantage of EFI.
quote:
Originally posted by Bosswrench:


FOAM air cleaners are dangerous on Webers regardless of tune, but paper ones are fine. K & Ns are maybe OK. What happens in IR intake manifolds is, very strong air pulses go back and forth from carb tip to intake valve, and carburetors are dumb devices: they will meter gas in either direction. So at resonant rpms, you get a small cloud of gas hanging above the carb ram tubes (sometimes called 'reversion'). The cloud soaks foam air cleaners; now all you need is a small backfire on starting and the whole thing bursts into flame. ALWAYS carry a fire extinguisher when running Webers! I've had 2 Weber-fires and my a... was saved the first time by a passing trucker with an extinguisher; the second time I had my own... The nice foam cleaners wound up in a ditch.
Next thing that happens if you don't get the fire out pronto is, the 8 small aux venturis that are in the middle of each carb throat are made of pot-metal, which melts at low temp in the fire and runs down the short intakes to the cylinder. If an intake valve happens to be open, molten metal runs into that cylinder and hardens on the piston. Guess what happens when you try to restart the motor? Time for a couple of new pistons!
FWIW, EFI does not meter fuel in reverse so this doesn't happen; just another little-known advantage of EFI.


WOW! I can see that happening, I had lots of backfires with the Webers but thank god never a fire. I guess I lucked out. Thanks for posting.
WOW!

I would only make two changes to that car:

1) black out the chrome trim on the Group4 tail light frames

2) change the ownership into my name

Amazing detail on your car. Those wheels are perfect.

Mark
quote:
Originally posted by Mark Charlton:
WOW!

I would only make two changes to that car:

1) black out the chrome trim on the Group4 tail light frames

2) change the ownership into my name

Amazing detail on your car. Those wheels are perfect.

Mark


Hahah, awesome. Yeah, I should black out the tail light trim. That'd be easy.
There are quite a few nice cars out there for sure, many members here have beautiful looking cars. But your car is probably the most unbelievably spectacular car I can ever remember seeing. The car reflects your great taste for what looks good and what works well together. Beyond your highly developed artistic eye, which is not so common, you have the talent to put it all together. You should be very proud of what you have accomplished. Breathtaking.

I happen to agree with Mark Charlton, I think if you black out the chrome around the Grp4 tail lights, the car comes together as one nice symetrical whole. The chrome tail light border looks slightly loud compared to the rest of the car and brings your eye to it...maybe more than what you want. It's just a small detail, but IMO I'd black it out.

But either way your car is a marvel to behold.

Take care,

David
quote:
Originally posted by 4NHOTROD:
I lost a race to a guy that won't race me again and now claims to be the local Pantera king.


burn rubber

Will, it WAS a surprising upset. Even I didn't expect to beat you by such a large margin — especially with my totally-stock car, but I NEVER said I was the "local Pantera King".

Mark
roll on floor
quote:
Originally posted by DeMopuar:
MacMan,

What did you have to do to the hub to get the Centerlock wheels to attach properly? Can you give some details on how you got this done? I really like that on your car -- don't see centerlocks very often on street cars. Looks great!

Mark


Thanks!!! The centerlocks use a hub adaptor. No modification required. I talked to Forgeline at length about strength, etc. and they are extremely confident. The car made 600 hp and I have drag radials out back. No problems. I believe that any of their wheels can be made for the centerlock conversion.

Check out Forgeline's page on the conversion:
http://www.forgeline.com/produ...lock-conversion.html

It's very much worth mentioning that we had to use the "tall" hub adaptor for the front (as well as the rear). The first set of wheels came with the short adaptor that wouldn't clear the spindle.
quote:
Originally posted by Corey Price:
Chris,

Wow, I just looked at the Forgeline wheels. Eeker

Looks great. How are the Webers?

I sent you a PM a while back, too.


The Webers are doing great! I think the intake has a slight oil leak so I'll have to re-do that at some point, but everything else is perfect. Having a lot of fun driving it on the weekends. Starts up easily and idles immediately. Good stuff.
I've never seen any reversion issues. Didn't even know what that was honestly. Had to look it up just now. No fire or fuel out of the webers as far as I have seen. I have aluminum mesh screens on the top of the stacks and they are still nice and clean. No signs of anything unwanted. No popping, back firing, etc.

Got the webers and intake from Pierce Manifolds. Good prices. They asked for some details such as the rev range, displacement and cam specifications. They sent everything pre-assembled so that I wouldn't have to figure out the linkages or anything. They were late getting the plate for the underside of the intake manifold so the machine shop fab'd one instead. Had an issue with the linkage popping off but that was easy to fix with a couple fender washers.

The webers had a nasty flat spot 2500 to 2800 rpm's. Everything else was good. I tweaked and tuned the mixture and reset and tuned to try to fix it. Couldn't get it. Finally called Augie Delgado, who is a Weber wizard. He gave me larger idle jets and whola! Runs like a champ now. Very smooth.

I would be interested to see how the car would run with a more traditional set up, but I can't imagine that I'd ever swap out the Webers long term. Just too cool and too much fun.
17x9.5 in the front. 3.25" backspacing.

18x12's in the rear. 3" backspacing.

Could easily go with wider wheels, but I went with sizes that would give me good tire options. I love the new meaty rear tires and short fronts that I have on there now.

I sent the measurements to Forgeline. Looked at the old wheels I had on there, measured them, and corrected the numbers so the new wheels would be perfect.

I'll be sure to take pictures of the adapter next time I pull a wheel.
I still have a small list of things that need to be done to the Pantera before I’d really consider it “finished”, but I’m happy with the outward appearance so it seemed like a good time to get some real photos. I contacted Jens Lucking, photographer extraordinaire, and asked him if he’d be interested. We planned for a day spent driving around Long Beach and LA. Jens scoped out the locations ahead of time. All I had to do was drive.

It was a long day but Jens was amazing. He is a true car lover and I think it shows in his work and the amount of effort he puts into every shot. He even pushed the ‘ol Pantera across three lanes of traffic on I-5 when the headers apparently overheated the MSD ignition system.

Anyhow, he’s awesome and affordable. Can’t thank him enough. If you need anything photographed, give him a shout! http://automotivephotographer.us/

Here are some of my favorites:















Chris,

I must have been sleeping when you posted those amazing photos shot by Jens Lucking. They are easily some of the most beautiful Pantera shots (of one of the most gorgeous Panteras...) I’ve even seen. Fantastic work and thanks for posting them!

Mark
quote:
Originally posted by SN8K ETR:
I first saw your car the PIM event and was blown away. Now that I've seen your posting on the build, I have a deeper appreciation for your vision and craftsmanship. You did say, "I want a Mangusta one day." Right?! Smiler


Very cool. Smiler
Oh man I would loooove a Mangusta! One of the most beautiful cars ever built in my opinion. Definitely on the wish list.
Chris, I hope you have those shots framed and on your garage wall. My favourites are the tunnel bridge shots. I love the blues of the tunnel wall picking up the blue in the stripes (and your shirt). The juxtaposition of the oil rigs to the Pantera is great. The shoot looks like it could use more drama. This probably went too far, but...

Attachments

Photos (1)
Likes (0)
Post
×
×
×
×