Bobby Byars says the problem is sometimes that the clutch master rod needs a locking nut on its actuating rod. The rod angles a little during normal use and can ride out of its shallow socket in the hydraulic piston. Adding a lock-nut prevents the adjustment from shifting and keeps the rod in place. Simple in concept, cheap to do and a true PIA to perform, as you need to deal with that little snap-ring once again while upside down under the dash.....
Interesting info, Boss. Although, I'm having a hard time imagining where that lock nut goes where there isn't one already. Also wondering if a broken clutch pedal return spring could also be a contributing factor if the rod is, indeed, riding out of the piston socket.

Anyway, thanks for your time. Appreciate it.


Ron

P.S. Last time I was under the dash, I thought I wasn't going to be able to get out. Can't be an age thing. Frowner
Sorry- I don't spend a lot of time on any one Forum, 'cause I'm on six, so.... I hesitate to diagnose clutch problems ar a distance. One car that I tried this on, the owner was unsuccessful in following my guesses. He was only 30 miles away so I went over there. The clutch bellcrank above the bellhousing was adjusted so far off, the clutch was half-disconnected at all times! No wonder the poor thing was slipping. It took wrenches and large pry-bars to 'disconnect' the linkage enough so a real adjustment could be done. I moved the splined lever THREE splines on its shaft and the car then drove normally.
FWIW, our '72 Pantera has 90,000 miles, was autocrossed weekly for 8 years and open-tracked many, many times. It's on its second pumped-up engine and the clutch is one of the few parts that is still 1972-OEM. Driven reasonably, they don't wear out that fast.
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