Those are the Vader Window motor regulators:

http://www.tmitch.com/

The kit was easy to install and worked very well. I highly recommend. I also ran the window power through relays for full power and the window switches are in the center console.
quote:
Originally posted by comp2:
Those are the Vader Window motor regulators:

http://www.tmitch.com/

The kit was easy to install and worked very well. I highly recommend. I also ran the window power through relays for full power and the window switches are in the center console.


Pricy.... Eeker In particular if shipped to Europe - taxes, taxes, taxes... Frowner
quote:
Pricy.... Eeker In particular if shipped to Europe - taxes, taxes, taxes... Frowner


Use the modification that uses the Taurus window motors. Much less expensive and fairly easy DIY.
quote:
Originally posted by comp2:
That's the best photo I got right now:




I still need to do the door internals and a few things before I have the interior done. I am going to leave the windshield out till they get the interior done so they have more access.

I did order the Vader window motor conversion.


Excellent looking dash set up. Where da tunes come from, behind your head? Big Grin
Here is a layout:



The PSI is for the front air bags. There is a switch bellow to switch between air bags and tank pressure.

Oil temp has a switch to read before and after oil cooler as does the water temp.

The airbag switch is a manual switch to inflate or deflate airbag.

Power steering is an electric pump which can be turned off and on.

There is also an O2 gauge on the dash as well as a fuel gauge.

The fuel gauge has a capacitance sender with no moving parts.
I finished the servo controller to control the heater box. It is ready to install.

I had to map the range of all the servos. This circuit reads the three pots and sends the position to the heater. It also turns off the servos after they have moved.

Fresh Air/Recirculation starts out with Rec. As you turn the knob, rec remains open and fresh begins to open. 1/2 way through both are full open. As you continue, the recirc closes till you have full fresh air.

This mix control is also applied to the floor and dash vent.

Defog/defrost is completely independent and controllable which has always been a pet peeve.





Have you fab'ed the dash controls? I can't find them on the previous dash photo

Have you ran the the car enough to see how the P2T2 supplies the core?
quote:
Originally posted by JFB #05177:
Have you fab'ed the dash controls? I can't find them on the previous dash photo

Have you ran the the car enough to see how the P2T2 supplies the core?


The second row up with the blue circles are all environmental:




These are the controls:



I installed the box and the knobs last night. I ran the wires to the fuse box and I have to finish the power plug to the box which I might get to tonight. Then I can start checking to make sure each servo is in the range it was suppose to be in.

When I built the circuit I had to map the range of each servo. To do so I sent identical commands to each heater servo independently and a second servo which had been modified with and angle gauge. I used the values in the microprocessor to the serial servo control which corresponded to the correct angles to write the program:



And this is exactly the sort of thing which has taken so long for this build to be finished! Smiler but it is getting there!

As far as the P2T2, I ran the car when I filled the cooling system. I had the heater valve open to purge the heating system and check for leaks. I ran it long enough to feel heat in the coolant and heater tubes but no more.

I have 1 or 2 gauges I still need to trouble shoot and water temp gauge is one. Other then pulling the car out of the garage and putting it back in I have not driven it.

I have finished all my before drive items except the engine firewall cover. Getting the battery box hold down was a biggie. As soon as I can get the engine firewall cover finished and as soon as it warms up I should be able to take a run down the road. We'll see what it is like without a windshield because that is going in after the interior in May.
quote:
When I built the circuit I had to map the range of each servo. To do so I sent identical commands to each heater servo independently and a second servo which had been modified with and angle gauge. I used the values in the microprocessor to the serial servo control which corresponded to the correct angles to write the program:



And this is exactly the sort of thing which has taken so long for this build to be finished! Smiler but it is getting there!

Gary, you never cease to amaze me! Can't wait to see the finished product. Your car that is. Maybe a whole slew of new Pantera products for sale too - turn signal switch controller, HVAC mix valve controller, etc.

Keep up the good work!
Sweet
Thanks Garth,

Pantera products are hard because the demand is a handful; which is why my hat is off to guys like Scott and others who do make and proof parts and sell them. There is a long way between a good part and a good product.

However the turn signal controller I am selling in an inertia version:

http://www.gasautosolutions.com/

It has been a slow start but that is ok. I have filled for a patent on 2 versions; the encoder version and the inertia version. I have trade marked the name.

I have had guys put them in Cobra's, hot rods, golf carts, Polaris, etc.

One guy who put one in a Cobra did not even know I made them and he asked if there was anything for turn signals for a guy like him who forgets to turn his off. He was one of the first guys to put the inertia version in and he says he can't trick it; it works every time.

My brother likes it for his Cobra as he has knocked off the turn signal arm at the track so the switch gets it off the column.

I have some interest from a steering column manufacturer for the encoder version. We'll see if that develops.

As far as the heater circuit, it is really too specialized. In fact, my concern has been selling the car with something so specialized. I gathered everything in a binder from the circuit layout, components, settings, programing to operation and maintenance such as replacing servos. I also have an extra control box to go with the car.

I have no plans to sell the car (ever) but if anything happens someone who buys the car can be confident that the heater can be supported if there is a problem. 6 months from now I will have forgotten what I had done so I had better do it now.
I had a handbrake from Summit Racing I wanted to use. As set up it does not exit out the floor but that can be changed latter; or I might have it exit out the back of the firewall.

Right now I just needed to get it mounted so the interior work can be done. I made a bracket out of 1/4" steel and powdercoated it. I did have to open up the box a bit.







In the spirit of out of the box thinking, here are some gauges I find very interesting. They may be more suitable to special applications such as engine stands or other projects but I think the idea is very cool:

http://www.4dsystems.com.au/product/uLCD_220RD/

You can create the graphics for any gauge you want to read your own defined parameters.

16 I/O pins including 4 for analog input

Several TTL or Ic2 inputs

PWM in and out

Encoder inputs

Data logging

Not sure what problem it would solve but it is very cool stuff.
I meant to post on here that I visited Gary a couple of months ago and got to see his work first hand. Very impressive and incredible craftsmanship!!

Very nice guy as well - glad I went.

-William
quote:
Originally posted by comp2:


Now they will know you're lying!

Smiler


Ok, then I'll have to prove it:

Thanks to Gary's step by step guidance, a dope like me was able to weld my very own welding cart!

Attachments

Images (1)
I actually don't have too many good shots yet. I guess life has just been busy. I have a few snap shots. I have a studio rear shot but I am not ready to release it yet. All I got for rear is when it was on the trailer heading for interior. Notice how high the front is with airbags:








Awsome choises of colours and materials, just love the leather and the stitching. Warm, detailed and stylish.
quote:
Originally posted by lastpushbutton:
Looks great Gary, congrats on getting it done so quickly! lol


Ha Ha, only 9 years!
Here's more on the interior. This is generally a finished snap shot. The ignition timing controls are under the hinged part of the console:



I do not have the forward section of roll bar installed right now but when the interior was done we had to make provisions for it. I moved the door handles where they would clear the roll bar. The door panels had to be built to clear the roll bar. Once interior was designed I removed the roll bar. Window controls are on center console. Window motors are Vader and I love them!

Door handles are aftermarket hot rod which I powdercoated flat black. The spline adapter did not fit the Pantera door handle spline so I 3D printed an adapter for the spline:





Rear bubble is steel and removable:



Steering column is Speedway Motors generic column which I built a surround for. I hated the Pantera column plus the wheel is removable now. With no provisions for turn signals I built a turn signal and light controller where I built an encoder to keep track of the steering wheel column to cancel the turn. Later this developed into an inertia based system and I have since achieved Patents on them.

Heater box is from scratch with a circuit to control it a bit different then normal ventilation systems with 8 servos.







That's at least some of it.
When I built the car all the air exits the hood. The hood I built from scratch. I did not want it to look like a GT-40 but I also did not know exactly how much opening I needed. The hood is the only radiator air flow exit.

I divided the hood into screen and a movable panel. I learned after driving it a lot this summer that in hot weather the movable panel needs to be open.

I decided to make a new panel with louvers to see if it would work ok closed. I like the raw metal look so I made one out of stainless. I bought a louver di and stamped the .050 stainless panel with louvers today. More to come:








The stainless steel louver panel is done. I was able to give it a slight compound curve to fit the hood. I welded on a front and sides. The sides allow it to be opened or closed.

Before I could only bolt it on open or closed but I laser cut curved cut outs so it can be positioned at any spot in between and it does not need to be completely unbolted to change position. Right now I have it mounted with the back opened about 3/4".

I did not want a shiny stainless finish since I have some raw aluminum parts. I wire brushed it in one direction to give it a less than shiny but uniform appearance.

i hate to say this, but for some reason, that doesn't fit into the details of the rest of the car. i don't have any suggestions nor points to support my opinion.

maybe it is just the angle of the one photo?
I'm not sure I disagree with you. It is however what it needed functionally. It is growing on me though.

The goal from the begining was to keep it from looking like a gt40 copy. I like the adjustability of the vent.

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