U.S-spec Pantera GTS  (one of 138 built both '73 and '74) are a decal version of the std. U.S. Pantera. Yours has the uncommon 'bumble-bee' paint scheme. There is a second variant sold only in Europe directly by DeTomaso, where the std narrow-body Pantera is the 'GTS'. That car could be optioned up to a GTS/Gr-3 Pantera with all sorts of things never sold in the U.S by Ford.

On the POCA Web site are two Gr-3 catalogues listing the possible legal add-ons once available. A GTS/Gr-3 was a potent club-racer and some were further upgraded for International FIA road-racing and hill climb events, back in the day. A few U.S. versions have received some of the Gr-3 add-ons over the last 45 years; you might check for their presence.

Congratulations on your new Pantera. Only 30 made in that colour combo! There are a couple of us with the same one lurking around here on the forum. If it still has the original paint, very carefully document it before taking it off if you are going to do a bare-metal respray. The yellow gold colour is special, as is the metalic black semi-gloss on the front and back decklids and the matt-black metallic on the lower parts, together with the matt black non metallic on the bumpers. You will probably find it has at least 3 different black paints on it.

Cheers, Tim.

It looks a beautiful car as is, remember they are only truly original once and in recent years true originality has commanded extra dollars, the more that are restored the rarer it becomes. Consider enjoying it and driving it for a while before jumping in to restoration that will ultimately see it off the road for a couple years typically.

Yes, we always try to preserve an original car if possible. Unfortunately this one has had a troubled youth. First step is to get it running and assess what we've got. We actually started the engine with an auxiliary fuel supply attached but the carb is plugged up so it won't stay running. It started pretty easily for a car that has been sitting since 1985... it has good oil pressure and sounds fantastic.

Once we get it running and driving we'll reassess. Any advice on the carb question?

 

Congrats and welcome, My car had the Autolite carb, the Holley is a better carb so keep it. The Autolite has an issue when you are in a high G turn the fuel sloshes and moves away from the pickup and the car runs out of gas, then after the G forces subside the fuel returns the car takes off and hang on! When I got my car 20 years ago the fuel tank was the problem.. it would pick up the junk from inside the tank and block the fuel filter causing the car to die. You could put the carb back to stock but trust me you (or the new owner) will put a Holley back on it. BossWrench can elaborate more on the issue.

74Alfa posted:

Thanks for the kind replies and advice.

Quick question... did the '74 GTS models come with the Motorcraft 4300 carb? This car has what looks to be an aftermarket Holley 3310 and Edelbrock  intake manifold.

Michael.

Hi Michael,

yes, it should have come originally with a Motorcraft 4300D and cast iron Ford intake manifold. If you source a 4300D and get it running properly, let us know as the general thinking is that they are difficult to get running right, but some of us may be tempted to try if we hear of some good experiences. 

Cheers, Tim.

The OEM 4300 series carburetors were equipped with a single fuel bowl of insufficient capacity, known to cause an engine to stumble when accelerating out of a corner. They were also equipped with crudely designed booster venturis having big tubes that dumped the fuel into the air stream. The air horn casting had a reputation for warping all too easily during assembly of the carburetor.

The Autolite 4300A carburetors installed on the 1971 M code engines were rated 630 cfm by Ford, but if measured using the same parameters used by Holley their flow would be rated approximately 480 cfm. They were small carburetors which I like to describe as “clogging” the engine. They were also emissions tuned. The 1971 M code engines were down by 25 horsepower compared to what they could have made if a performance-tuned Holley rated about 600 cfm had been installed.

The Motorcraft 4300D carburetors installed on the 1972 through 1974 Q code engines were rated 750 cfm by Ford, but if measured using the same parameters used by Holley their flow would be rated approximately 600 cfm. The 4300D carburetor didn’t “clog” the engine as the 4300A version did. But 1972 was the year that emissions tuning took the most pronounced step in severity. Compared to what they could have made if a well-tuned Holley rated about 600 cfm had been installed the 1972 Q code engines were down 75 horsepower, the 1973 Q code engines were down 90 horsepower, and the 1974 Q code engines were down 80 horsepower.

Understanding the performance sacrificed in using the Autolite/Motorcraft carburetors De Tomaso installed 600 cfm Holley carburetors on the engines installed in the early Push Button Panteras. They also installed 650 cfm Holley “double pump” carburetors on the engines installed in GTS, Gp3, GT5 and GT5-S Panteras.

The 4300A version is too small, they aren't worth modifying. The 4300D would be a better candidate for modifying because it flows more air, somebody skilled with these carburetors could revise the 4300D air/fuel ratio calibration, and recoup most of the horsepower these carburetors rob from an engine. I had a "carburetor" guy who did this for me back in the 1970s & 1980s. However finding a person to tune a Motorcraft 4300D today is difficult. And even after recalibrating the carburetor it shall still have the fuel stumble issue caused by the small fuel bowl; so paying to have a 4300D modified seems like a bad investment to me.   

Thus for anything outside of a 100% factory restoration I would replace an OEM carburetor with a performance tuned carburetor of 600 to 680 cfm air flow capacity (flow rated using Holley criteria). It should be tuned for a richer A/F ratio (street performance), and it should feature vacuum secondaries, high capacity dual fuel bowls, an electric choke and most importantly annular booster venturis. Annular booster venturis provide a stronger “signal” for more precise fuel metering (especially at low rpm), they atomize fuel better (smaller droplets flash into vapor more readily) and they mix and distribute the fuel more evenly in the air stream – thus they promote a more consistent air/fuel ratio from cylinder to cylinder. Annular booster venturis close the gap in performance between carburetors and throttle body fuel injection.

The carburetors I would choose from include:

  1. Summit Racing p.n. M08600VS
  2. Demon Carburetors p.n. 1282020VE (discontinued but can still be found)
  3. QFT SS-680-VS custom ordered with annular booster venturis ($125 extra)

Since your Pantera's engine was originally equipped with a “spread bore” carburetor it shall require a replacement “square bore” intake manifold for the replacement carburetor. If you choose to utilize an OEM square bore cast iron intake manifold you will need to increase the diameter of the four carburetor butterfly holes to 111/16 inches diameter (1.69 or 1.70 inches). Another option is the Edelbrock #2665.

It is a rare and beautiful colored Pantera. I knew of that car. Keep in mind the old adage, their only original once. Think twice before busting it down for restoration, like the River Of No Returns, it is a one way street. lol. Hopefully you were provided the original parts along w/the car. If not, I have the perfect combination for that car, interestingly from a GTS Model. I can sell you the entire package if you like, the date codes match for your Pantera. Have a look. Keep it in wraps for future us, or If you want to install it, we'll rebuild & set the carburetor up for direct installation, including having a perfect refinishing., air cleaner as well. Kindly PM me if interested, the package is not that expensive. I personally think their fun to drive with that 4300D. Gives you a kick in the pants when those large secondaries open!

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George P posted:

 

Understanding the performance sacrificed in using the Autolite/Motorcraft carburetors De Tomaso installed 600 cfm Holley carburetors on the engines installed in the early Push Button Panteras. They also installed 650 cfm Holley “double pump” carburetors on the engines installed in GTS, Gp3, GT5 and GT5-S Panteras.

 

Thanks for the information George. However, I'm a little confused by the statement above. If my car is a 1974 GTS, would this mean it would have originally had a 650 CFM Holley double-pumper?

Hi Michael,

there were two types of GTS. The US GTS, which yours is, only 150 made and verifiable by having GT in the chassis number - and as stated, only 30 made in your colour combination. These were basically a standard L Pantera (i.e. with a Motorcraft 4300D) with a body kit. Then there were the European GTS Panteras, of which it is unclear how many were made, and which have no special distinguishing feature in the chassis number - they had the body kit and go-faster bits such as in some cases other carburetors, like the Holley 650. If you haven't had a look at the Provamo site, then go in and check out the section on GTS Panteras, it describes both types.

Cheers, Tim.

sharkey posted:

It is a rare and beautiful colored Pantera. I knew of that car. Keep in mind the old adage, their only original once. Think twice before busting it down for restoration, like the River Of No Returns, it is a one way street. lol. Hopefully you were provided the original parts along w/the car. If not, I have the perfect combination for that car, interestingly from a GTS Model. I can sell you the entire package if you like, the date codes match for your Pantera. Have a look. Keep it in wraps for future us, or If you want to install it, we'll rebuild & set the carburetor up for direct installation, including having a perfect refinishing., air cleaner as well. Kindly PM me if interested, the package is not that expensive. I personally think their fun to drive with that 4300D. Gives you a kick in the pants when those large secondaries open!

Thanks. I have some docs showing that the car was in Florida and some receipts from Pantera Miami. We can discuss over PM.

First, welcome aboard.

There are guys here like George and Boss Wrench that know more about these cars than we will ever know. It's mind blowing the knowledge they have.

I also have a GTS that has the same carb / manifold set up but mine is a Euro model. I was also questioning the originality of the carb manifold but decided to let it be. Being a post Ford car it's hard to know for sure so why care ?  The Ford Pantera's have better traceability so you are lucky. 

These are easy cars to understand and to work on provided you have basic mechanical skills and manuals. Other than a transaxle I would say have at it and don't be afraid to ask because this is the place for answers. No such thing as a dumb question. 

And yes, many of us have told the other half we would sell after a restore but few admit it . All for fun.

 

74Alfa posted:

Ok, so I'm doing my research and discovered that this car also has 4V heads. Is this a stock feature of a US-GTS?

Some folks will tell you that US-GTS Panteras were manufactured in 1973 and 1974. That is a misconception. ALL US (North American) GTS Panteras were manufactured after July 1, 1973. They all have chassis numbers greater than 5900. Thus they are ALL 1974 models. 

The federal government (US EPA) and California (California ARB) had different tail pipe emissions criteria. Auto makers had to acquire approval from the US EPA to sell cars in the 49 states, and they had to acquire approval from the California ARB to sell cars in California. The California tail pipe emissions standards have always been the more stringent of the two. The federal standards remained unchanged from 1973 to 1974. BUT California's tail pipe emissions standards did change for model year 1974. Ford either refused to modify the 1974 351C 4V engine to achieve smog approval in California for 1974, or it may have been physically impossible for them to achieve approval. So in order to sell 1974 Panteras in California, the Panteras were re-documented as 1973 models, this includes the GTS versions.

To answer your question …. Yes the US-GTS Panteras (which as explained were all 1974 models) were all equipped with 1974 cobra jet engines (Q code engines) having D3ZE head castings (78cc combustion chambers), pistons with 8cc dishes, and about 8:1 mechanical compression. They also had the 1973 exhaust gas recirculation system … which was relatively unique to the Pantera.

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